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Thread: Shrimp Powder?

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    jglass's Avatar
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    Default Shrimp Powder?

    They had shrimp powder at the Mexican cooking store I was at the other day. What would you use that for?

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    The Ironic Chef is offline Master Chef
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    I'm thinking it could be used to turn a Bloody Mary into a Bloody Shrimp Cocktail.

    I know that a lot of oriental recipes use a lot of dried shell fish for recipes. I guess it's a good source for a fish stock.

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    Cook Chatty Cathy is offline Master Chef
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    Maybe our new member from the Phillipines [Kitchen Pixie] could help us out here???
    Last edited by Cook Chatty Cathy; 02-26-2009 at 06:52 PM.

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    jglass's Avatar
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    Our friend Noi probably uses it. They are Thai but I wouldnt be able to understand her if I asked lol. She has a thick accent.

  5. #5
    kitchen pixie Guest

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    I didn't know they also use it in Mexico but a little search shows that it's used for shrimp patties. I found some interesting links but I couldn't post them yet (my post count is still low). I've sent you a PM then maybe you can post it later.

    In Asia, it's use to add flavor, especially when cooking noodles. The shrimp powder is mixed with the sauted veggies or broth.

    Locally, we buy them dried (small shrimps) called hibe (hee-beh). You can rehydrate them, pound or powder them. I also add these to rice soups (congee, arros caldo). Use in moderation since they give off a very distinct taste when used so much. Dried shrimps has certain smell that's not every Westerner may find appealing. Some commercial shrimp powder have MSG, which I try to avoid using.

    What we love to have as seasoning too is shrimp paste. This can be home made or store bought. This is definitely a must try for the courageous food taster when in Asia.

  6. #6
    chubbyalaskagriz's Avatar
    chubbyalaskagriz is offline Master Chef
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    I am unfamilar, janie...

    Pixie... I worked in many Alaskan kitchens and we always had staffers from the Phillipines on board. I also managed a fisherman's bunkhouse out on the Aleutian Island chain and we had fisherman from all over the world- including the Phillipines. I have enjoyed the food of many a Filipino cook! Once, at The Unisea Inn in Dutch Harbor, an elderly prep cook named Florencio actually produced a worn and dated black & white 8X10 photo that showed him dressed in spiffy chef-whites w/ a large group of staff, standing w/ President and Mrs. Ferdinand Marcos!

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    jfain is offline Master Chef
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitchen pixie View Post
    In Asia, it's use to add flavor, especially when cooking noodles. The shrimp powder is mixed with the sauted veggies or broth.

    Locally, we buy them dried (small shrimps) called hibe (hee-beh). You can rehydrate them, pound or powder them. I also add these to rice soups (congee, arros caldo). Use in moderation since they give off a very distinct taste when used so much. Dried shrimps has certain smell that's not every Westerner may find appealing. Some commercial shrimp powder have MSG, which I try to avoid using.

    What we love to have as seasoning too is shrimp paste. This can be home made or store bought. This is definitely a must try for the courageous food taster when in Asia.
    I've been to several countries in Asia and I've seen/smelled the large bins of dried shrimp. They definitely have a pong about them when they are in such large quantity but it's very tasty as you say when used in moderation. I have some shrimp paste at home and I use it the same way I would use fish sauce just to add some depth and je ne sais quoi to a dish

  8. #8
    chubbyalaskagriz's Avatar
    chubbyalaskagriz is offline Master Chef
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    When I worked in Alaskan fishing communities (like Dutch Harbor, the Pribolovs, Kodiak, etc...) we were surrounded by seafood processing plants and sea-going processor vessels. Mainly only pure muscle-protein product was harvested for this country, while the last bits of the catch (including by-catch) was sent over-seas to mainly Asian countries where literally everything was utilized (from skin and bone, to scales, viscera and all soft tissue. ) I tell ya... those peoples can make delicious food product outta danged near anything!

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    jglass's Avatar
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    Jon has PT today so I think I'll go next door and pick up some of the shrimp powder.
    It may be useful when Im cooking asian food.

  10. #10
    kitchen pixie Guest

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    Hi Chub. It's nice to know you've met some Filipino cooks. I bet they have surprised you on how "inventive" they can be. Being able to cook for any President must be one's proud moment, that's why Florencio keeps the picture.

    jglass, I think you can use it to flavor any shrimp dish you may have. But really be careful to use it in moderation. It can be overpowering.

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